Wednesday, August 23, 2006

What is traditional Kung Fu Tea?


Beside the known meaning of Kung Fu Tea = A lot of work/practices to prepare tea.
What is the true method and practice of it? Where is the origin and steps for it? and the meaning behind the steps?
Who really understood the practice of it? Too many questions, too little answer. Anyone....

11 comments:

~ Phyll said...

The ultimate goal is to reach the skill of "drinking without drinking."

:)

davelcorp said...

I don't have an answer to your question, nor do I expect you want one.

However, I love the simplicity of the tea set in the photos. The brewers skill is evident, even in still photos.

toki said...

I acutely do wanted to find out what is your understanding of Kung Fu Tea. Or other readers reflection on it.

The Hong Kong style Kung Fu comparing to Fujain or Chaozhou? The Taiwanese adoption/development based on Mainland Gong Fu etc....

MarshalN said...

I suppose mine is very much a HK style. No sniffer, emphasis on taste and mouthfeel...

davelcorp said...

I doubt what I do is a 'style.' I'm mostly self taught from observation, the web, and experimentation.

Simple set up with tea tray, yixing or gaiwan (usually yixing), boiling water, and a reserve pitcher.

Brew with short infusions (variable with the tea and how well I know it) into the reserve pitcher.

Pour into tea cup, smell, drink, smell cup.

Repeat.


I can appreciate a more formalized approach, especially if done skillfully, but for everyday brewing I just want to focus on the tea, not the person pouring it.

~ Phyll said...

I learned it from an older Chinese guy who was my martial art instructor. He was Fujianese. He made it a strict point of using enough dry leaves to cover exactly 1/2 the yixing teapot. The rest is pretty standard...rinse once, then start with about 5 secs. We were drinking mostly high fire TGY everyday. No sniffer cup for us too.

The most unnerving thing was that he would observe me prepare the tea step-by-step. He would tell me if my focus was worse today than yesterday and such. How? By how flowing my movements were and by how much tea I spill when I pour it into the cups straight from the pot (the circular movement). And, of course, by the taste of the tea.

It was all fun! I miss the good ol' time with him...he was a formidable man in my life.

icetea said...

i wrote something about modern gong-fu called "Lu-Yu Small Pot Tea Laws, (陸羽小壺茶法) created by Tsai, Rong Tsang (蔡榮章)

http://teaarts.blogspot.com/2005_08_01_teaarts_archive.html

also here is something ...
this is something that i helped a little but i did not write http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gongfu_tea_ceremony

on wiki i my name is sherdwen and icetea8
here is my blogmainpage

http://teaarts.blogspot.com/

it looks like chinese but if you dig you'll find english...
i think you have done well with this one.

-icetea

MarshalN said...

I don't see anything remarkable about your "Luyu Xiaohu Chafa", icetea, other than your use of papercups and your improvisation of using the big bowl as a chahe. Is that part of what's special about your method? Last I checked, papercups give off a nasty wax smell to the tea if the water's hot.

neeraj said...

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=SLcGch6koh4

Maybe you seen this, but others might have not.

Bill said...

Nice pics! I love gongfu postings!

Diana Guess said...
This comment has been removed by the author.
 
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